Pastor explains, whether it is still politically correct to wish a merry Christmas

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  • The discussion about the political correctness of Christmas traditions is back in full swing
  • A priest explains why we need to stop arguing about it

Every year again … the same discussion. Christmas is still politically correct? I may want a people with a different religious affiliation, a merry Christmas or is this kind of discrimination?

The question is politically Prudent, in Germany and in the United States, where even the “war on Christmas”.

She drives right-wing populists, to sense behind every “winter market”, not “is the Christmas market”, a surrender of the Occident against the Orient. Even if it is only for commercial reasons, so that he can stay the Christmas open.

Of all people, a priest brings in the debate suggested now all the cool sounds: Kevin O’brien, parish priest and Dean of the “Jesuit school of Theology” at the University of Santa Clara in the United States.

Totally the wrong question

He says: Much more important to answer these questions is to ask the question, if you ever need to be answered.

In a Video of the US news page “Mic,” he explains, why we finally stop fighting before Christmas over political correctness. Whether it be “Merry Christmas” or “Happy Holidays”.

“I don’t think Jesus would care whether we wish us “Merry Christmas” or “Happy holidays,”” he says in the Video. “Finally, it was not his goal, even to prices, but the reign of God. This is a community of love, peace and justice.”

It is more important to life Christmas really, so O’brien. It is a matter of values such as simplicity, generosity, openness and kindness towards other people.

Light market instead of Christmas market

So much Serenity of a Christian cleric makes a pretty ridiculous act, which outraged the AfD last month: The right-wing populists were afraid of the “abolition of the Christmas season”, after in Elmshorn in Schleswig-Holstein a “light market” instead of a Christmas market was held.

Many Muslims seem to find this discussion on their alleged discrimination by Christmas greetings also absurd. Menerva Hammad, a blogger at the HuffPost, says: “As a Muslim I can say to all: Who’s going to feel because of the strength and good wishes for Christmas already discriminated against? Traditions and religions of our fellow man are very important. After all, we live all together in one country.”

Hammad lives in Austria and is in addition to Muslim – Christian traditions.

Find out more: So strong is Christmas really the Islamization of threatened

“The memories of the common Crafts in the Kindergarten, the Singing, the peaceful mood, the daily Opening of the advent calendar and the Lighting of the candles on the advent wreath – all of these things were for Christmas rituals, I waited as a child from year to year,” she says.

“Even if you don’t believe yourself, so you can leave at least the traditions, the get togethers, the food and the family atmosphere as they are.”

“As a good Christian I need to protect the rights of Muslims”

In the discussion on the political correctness of Christmas traditions, we should not forget therefore that treating each other with respect, with tolerance and openness is possible, without forgetting their own traditions.

O’brien, from the University of Santa Clara looks similar. “Of course, Christians must defend, as believers of other religions, have the right to their Faith. But it’s not just about protecting Christianity – As a good Christian I need to protect the rights of Muslims.”

“In this sense: Merry Christmas, Happy holidays and peace for all!”

Young Urban Muslims – the voice for all the young Muslims who have no desire to, that always only talk about her.

(sk)